Job Loss


I have found myself becoming more reflective over the past few years as everyone, it seems, has been impacted by the Great Recession in some way.  But at the end of the day I remind myself and others what really matters:  Us.  And the memories we form together during the 525,600 minutes that comprise a year.

In the Broadway play RENT (that I was so thrilled to see in its first month on stage way back in 1996), there’s just the most amazing song that I’ve forever loved, “Seasons of Love”.  If you haven’t heard it or if it’s been awhile since you’ve listened to it, I highly recommend doing so.  It’s not at all a traditional holiday song but as you find yourself on “holiday deadlines” (tree needs to be decorated by Wednesday, outside lights are past-due, gifts need to be purchased by Dec 15, etc.), take a moment…come up for air…and take a listen to “Seasons of Love” on YouTube.  It will put it all in perspective for you.

And check out our really cool, latest newsletter HERE!  Includes a $100 gift offering to YOU….

Happy Holidays!

Brian

I have many Baby Boomer career transition clients so I often recommend Jeri Sedlar’s and Rick Miner’s book, Don’t Retire, REWIRE! It’s a fantastic guide for folks who simply aren’t ready for retirement even though their age may suggest otherwise and/or it’s for people who simply need to continue to work for financial reasons but choose to work in a field for which they have passion.  It’s a great how-to guide for boomers but I would argue that Gen X folks can benefit from the book as well.  Plan for the future!

That being said, I’m thrilled to have Jeri as my guest blogger today!  Here is her sage advice on how to not let turbulent times steal your dreams!

The adage “one size does not fit all” couldn’t be truer than during these challenging times. Many people have postponed their retirements for financial reasons and others have decided to stay put and not pursue a new career or dream job because of workplace uncertainties. However there is a segment of our population who is saying ENOUGH and has decided to take action in terms of their work dreams! People of all ages are moving out of the pack and are investigating new playing fields!

People have recognized that there is never a perfect time to make a move. It’s always easy to find some type of excuse, real or imagined, to postpone moving forward. The reality is that the economy is slowly recovering and new normal situations are being created. But the key is that each of us will create our own new normal; it won’t be a collective happening! Change is the new reality and each of us needs to become our own change agent. So the truth is— you should be planning for your own economic recovery now!

I recently spoke to an engineer who said, “Let everyone else sit it out on the sidelines, wondering what’s going to happen! I want to be a cartoonist, and I’m not getting any younger!” So what did he do? He signed up for a weekend class on cartooning. This is an example of someone who is sticking to his original dream and is taking a small step to get there. He anticipates working for another three years then hopes to move into a career in cartooning. To him, this is all a part of effective life planning.

If you believe in your idea or dream, and believe enough in your self to try something new, then use this time to move on. Small steps matter. And tools and resources are in abundance if you choose to investigate them and use them. Many people are feeling overworked, underappreciated and living with too much ambiguity. So why not use the time to take charge of your future.  You will have to realign your time, and there could be trade offs, but I guarantee you will feel a sense of accomplishment and hope! And taking action toward a new career, regardless of how small the action, will positively impact your physical and mental health.

So how do you make your dream come true at a time when everything around you says wait, it’s the wrong time to make a change, to follow a passion or find your next job? You use your resources to discover the people, places and things to assist you on your rewiring® journey. Whether you want to use your current skills in a new way, express your values through your work, follow an old passion or just plain have more fun, go for it, now.

The following ideas are meant to jump start your next career:

  • know yourself- identify your drivers*, know what makes you tick
  • be able to articulate WHY you want to change careers
  • be able to express your passion for your new direction
  • build a network of people in your new field
  • do an exploratory and talk to experts; get their advice
  • do the legwork to discover what education or skills you need
  • take a course
  • shadow someone doing the job/profession/craft you are interested in
  • create a bibliography on your selected topic
  • join an association related to your dream job
  • Attend webinars online or go to conferences
  • read related blogs, magazines
  • volunteer; it’s an inexpensive way to try something new
  • take a part time in your chosen field
  • fill in for someone in the field
  • take advantage of all resources available

And of course test drive your new career by taking a VocationVacation!  It is the best way to actually work along side someone who is already doing it.  You’ll get to ask questions, get the feel for the job, and above all else test yourself to confirm your interest.  You will probably have some fun, but most important, it could change your life.

Jeri Sedlar & Rick Miners are the authors of Don’t Retire, REWIRE! 5 Steps to Fulfilling Work that Fuels Your Passion, Suits Your Personality and Fills Your Pocket!

*Drivers are our personal motivators.  When Jeri and Rick did the research for their book, Don’t Retire, REWIRE!, they asked people why they work beyond a paycheck.  They responded with 85 different reasons, which Jeri and Rick call “drivers”.

So, how do YOU plan to REWIRE!?  Let me know…..


I have been asked by more and more people which books and resources I recommend to my clients to compliment their career consultations and/or their one-one-one career mentorship VocationVacation experience(s).

Here is my down-and-dirty list before heading out for the weekend with the Wadester.  We are driving to a favorite place of ours — the eastern Columbia River Gorge for the opening season weekend at Maryhill Museum (check out the passion turned vocation by its founder, Sam Hill!).  But, as usual, my A.D.D. and I digress about the weekend….so here’s my list:

Hot Off The Press Suggestions:

My pal Randi Bussin just wrote a couple of great pieces that you may find on Job-Hunt.org:

5 Steps To Starting Your Career Reinvention

and

5 Steps  to Implementing Your Successful Career Reinvention

Here are two books that haven’t been released yet but I think you should add to your must-read list:

1.  What’s Next? by U.S. News & World Report contributing editor, Kerry Hannon.  This is a wonderful resource book full of advice and honest encouragement from people who have garnered up the courage to make career changes and reinvent themselves.  Kerry’s book comes out in June.  Mark your calendars!

2.  SpyMom by Valerie Agosta.  This is a true story about how Val’s passion, curiosity and need to “give back” led her from being a regular ol’ soccer mom of three kids to becoming a private investigator with a focus on clients who were women and children in need.  Val also writes about her ten-year battle with cancer along her journey of becoming a P.I.  This book is heart-warming and full of inspiration.  If you are questioning if you can really make a career transition, read this book.  Val tragically lost her battle with cancer in March, 2009 but she more than won the battle of making a career transition.  We miss her dearly as a VocationVacations mentor.  We look forward to granting the second annual Valerie Agosta “Live Your Best Life” VocationVacation Scholarhip this December.  Submissions will be accepted in early April on the VocationVacations website so please stay tuned for that and pick up a copy of SpyMom as of April 1.

I’ve also been asked what my favorite resume-writing book is.  That’s tough.  To be honest, I HATE writing resumes.  I really do.  So I don’t do them.  I like to focus on my strengths and writing resumes is not one of them.  Don’t get me wrong, resumes (as well as LinkedIn profiles and summaries) are important for clients.  So instead, I partner with two amazing resume writers, Miriam Salpeter, of Keppie Careers and Julie Ghatan.  I asked Miriam what her favorite “how-to” resume-writing book is.  She immediately responded with the recommendation of Resume Magic by Susan Britton Whitcomb.

My Tried and True Suggested Career Transition Books Are:

Do YOU have a favorite career transition book or resource?  Please share!

Cheers,
Brian

Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/pages/Brian-Kurth/202325023648?ref=ts
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/briankurth
Twitter:  http://twitter.com/BrianKurth

In this down-turned economy, I get a lot of prospective clients telling me, with almost an apology, “You know Brian, what I REALLY want to do with my life is become a Travel Writer.”  And then they follow with a chuckle, “But, come on, how does one do that?  It’s not feasible, is it?”

My reply:  You won’t know unless you try it out.  But, yes, it can be done!

Now, granted, it goes without saying that travel writing is a competitive business.  Who doesn’t want to travel to cool places and write about them and give one’s suggestions and recommendations to others, right?  Sign me up!   The reality is, however, that the world of magazine, newspaper and book publishing is in a paradigm shift.  Dollars are fewer.  Advances are nearly gone.  And the hours to make the dollars are longer.  And, yet, people DO succeed as writers — and, yes, you Rick Steves wannabes, even travel writers.

Why?  Because many of us still love to travel, fantasize and plan where we will visit some day or because some of us still place importance of travel and exploration high on our list of things to do in life and budget accordingly each year.  Also, corporations and organizations are still sending their employees out on business trips — and the employees want to combine some fun exploration along with their business meetings.  People are not staying at home, folks.  The “staycation” thing only goes so far to feed one’s soul.  Hence, it’s Economics 101:  Supply and demand.  There is still demand for travel writing.  There are still readers.  And as long as there are still readers, there are advertisers and sponsors….and, hence, travel writers will be employed.  Yes, the Great Recession has made the field even more competitive.  The cream rises to the top.  Yes, the ad dollars are down.  No, you might not become a fairly wealthy travel writer like Rick Steves but, YES, you CAN make a decent living at it.

How?

AOL just wrote about one of our former clients, Craig Zabaransky, this past week.  He went from working the corporate life as a consultant in the finance sector in Manhattan…to getting laid off…to having his office become his laptop and mobile phone.  Yep.  Craig has become a full-time travel writer this past year!  He offered up some great advice on how to become a travel writer on AOL…..

http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2010/03/11/management-consultant-to-travel-writer/

I need to put in a little plug for Craig’s amazing travel writer mentor, Ron Stern.  Craig’s transition was made easier due to Ron’s advice, expertise and hands-on mentorship while on Craig’s Travel Writer VocationVacation (which was a gift from Craig’s fiance, how cool is that?) in March, 2009.  He has helped Craig and many other aspiring travel writers create their tangible, common-sensible, realistic action plans for their part-time or full-time (as is the case with Craig) career transition.

So, if you want to become a travel writer — part-time or full-time — you CAN do it.  Even in this economy.  Craig is proof in the pudding.  Congratulations, Craig!

Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/pages/Brian-Kurth/202325023648?ref=ts
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/briankurth
Twitter:  http://twitter.com/BrianKurth
Test-Drive Your Dream Job:  A Step-By-Step Guide To Finding And Creating The Work You Love: www.amazon.com

I taped this interview with CNN Money on Wed and it ran on CNN.com on Friday.  It tells a great story of how a VocationVacation assisted Cory Chacon in making her career transition into the hotel hospitality field after being laid off from her marketing position at Virgin Records due to the downturn of the music industry:

http://money.cnn.com/video/news/2010/02/18/n_find_dream_jobs_vocation_vacation.cnnmoney/

Now, on a less serious note:  Beard or No Beard?  My family is split 50/50 on it.  What do you think?

Have a great Sunday, everyone!

Brian
Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/pages/Brian-Kurth/202325023648?ref=ts
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/briankurth
Twitter:  http://twitter.com/BrianKurth
THE book on career transition:  Test-Drive Your Dream Job:  A Step-By-Step Guide To Finding And Creating The Work You Love (Hachette, 2008)

You know, these days, some folks are forgetting to have fun in their work or job search (yes, job search can and SHOULD be fun at times).  I feel there is a pervasive “heaviness” in the air due to the economic conditions in the US, the constant partisanship in DC, overall “worry” about world affairs and terrorism….and an increasing burn-out from those employed making up the hours for their laid-off colleagues who are equally burning out in their job search.  Hence, people are simply tired.  Let’s rid ourselves of this heaviness as best we can.

What is my advice to all of you burned-out folks – regardless of whether you are employed or unemployed – to reduce your feeling of “heaviness”?

GET OUT OF THERE!

Get out of your office or home office for a day or two and work remotely from a new and different locale.

“I’m too busy with work,” you say?  Take the work with you.  Have laptop & mobile phone, will travel.  This is the Internet/iPhone/Blackberry age for crying out loud!  Work can be done just about anywhere.   Any reasonable boss can be convinced of such (if your boss isn’t reasonable or rational, then you have another matter to address). You can take the work with you.  No excuses!

“I am unemployed and can’t afford to take a work vacation and leave town.”  Fair enough.  Then hop in the car, on the bus or subway and change your environment.  Head to a coffee shop with WiFi in a completely different neighborhood, town or city within, say one hour, than you’re accustomed.  No excuses!

Why is it so important to spend time working out of your office or home office from time to time?  How do you, your employer and/or job search benefit?   Here are a few reasons:

1.  Increased productivity and creativity – It is proven that when people shake things up a bit, they can actually increase the quality and quantity of their output by “clearing the mind”.  No excuses!

2.  Law of Diminishing Returns – as you burn the candle at both ends, the return on investment for your time decreases along with your productivity.  By “getting out of there” and shaking things up, you will actually mitigate and maybe even eliminate the diminishing returns you’re creating for yourself.  No excuses!

3.  Fresh air – mind, body and soul.  Now, I’m not a psychologist but it’s not rocket science to understand that seeing grass, snow, flowers, squirrels, trees, the blue sky and the sun is beneficial to your well-being.  Get out of your cubicle for a day or two.  Get out of your home office for a day or two.  If you’re job searching, you can make phone calls from just about anyplace as long as it’s quiet…..and you can email resumes and network  online via LinkedIn, et al from anywhere.  No excuses!

Do I practice what I preach?  Absolutely.  Here is a photo of my MacBook with a view of the Pacific coast in Lincoln City, Oregon just two weeks ago.  Only two hours from Portland.  Did I break the bank by getting away?  Absolutely not.  Getting away on a Monday and Tuesday during off-season is dirt cheap.  Especially in this economy.  And, again, if you can’t afford to actually get out of town for an overnight stay, then AT LEAST get out of your neighborhood, town and city and spend the day in a different neighborhood, town or city.  Just for a day.  No excuses!

I promise you’ll see an increase in your productivity and creativity while feeling less burned out.  And you’ll PHYSICALLY feel better.

So, grab your iPhone, Blackberry, laptop, writing journal and whatever else you need to get the job or job search done and GET OUT OF THERE!  No excuses.

Cheers!
Brian

Brian Kurth

Career Reinvention & Transition Expert, Speaker, Author, TV Contributor and Founder of VocationVacations

Brian Kurth + Company:  www.briankurth.com

VocationVacations:  www.vocationvacations.com

971.544.1535 Office

Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/pages/Brian-Kurth/202325023648?ref=ts

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/briankurth

Twitter:  http://twitter.com/BrianKurth

Test-Drive Your Dream Job:  A Step-By-Step Guide To Finding And Creating The Work You Love

I am still sometimes surprised when people in their 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s are reluctant to get a career mentor. They think getting a mentor is just for the 20-year old college intern or the fresh-out-of-grad school young corporate exec.

Of course that’s not the case…but it takes some convincing for some folks. The biggest obstacles for most people seem to be their apprehension to research and recruit a mentor (“Where do I begin?”) and their impression that people simply don’t want to help them in their career development.  I have found that a good 40% of qualified, well-researched, prospective mentors will become a mentor if/when they are asked. Making the ask is the key!  So it is a numbers game.  People DO want to help out their fellow man!  The impression that finding a good mentor is a needle in the haystack is a falsehood.

Finding a good mentor is dependent upon establishing your criteria and effective research using key tools such as LinkedIn, Google search, your alumni association, trade associations as well as simple networking through your family, friends and colleagues.  Then, once you make one “ask” of a qualified prospective mentor, you will find it easier to make the second and third, etc.  It may be a numbers game.  You may need to ask ten people prior to finding your mentor.  But it is worth the time and energy.  Trust me.  I’ve seen thousands of people benefit from career mentorship in my work over the past 6 years.

Have you (or a loved one who’s “stuck” in a career rut?) acted on your motivation to get a mentor? If not, what obstacles are preventing YOU or your loved one from researching and recruiting a mentor in a current industry or a new, exciting career?

Cheers,
Brian
www.briankurth.com
www.vocationvacations.com

Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/pages/Brian-Kurth/202325023648?ref=ts
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/briankurth
Twitter:  http://twitter.com/BrianKurth
Test-Drive Your Dream Job:  A Step-By-Step Guide To Finding And Creating The Work You Love

Next Page »